What is recreational therapy?

What do you think of when we say therapy? Do you think of playing a video game, making crafts, or painting a picture? You might if you’ve ever experienced recreational therapy! The American Therapeutic Recreation Association (ATRA) defines recreational therapy (RT), or therapeutic recreation, as “a systematic process that utilizes recreation and other activity-based interventions to address the assessed needs of individuals with illnesses and/or disabling conditions, as a means to psychological and physical health, recovery, and well-being.” ARTA goes on to describe RT as a “treatment service designed to restore, remediate, and rehabilitate a person’s level of functioning and independence in life activities, to promote health and wellness, as well as reduce or eliminate the activity limitations and restrictions to participation in life situations caused by an illness or disabling condition.” Recreational therapists, according to ARTA, use “a wide range of activity- and community-based interventions and techniques to improve the physical, cognitive, emotional, social, and leisure needs of their clients.” Recreational therapists help their clients to develop the skills, knowledge, and behaviors that they need for daily living and community involvement.

Why is RT important? It is important because its principal objective is to improve a person’s functioning and assist them in staying as active, healthy, and independent as possible in the life pursuits they have chosen. What makes RT unique is the use of recreational modalities as part of an individual’s intervention strategies. This approach is individualized to each person by their interests and lifestyle. By incorporating a person’s interests, their family and friends, and their community, recreational therapists make the therapy process more meaningful and relevant for the people they serve. Who is RT for? Recreational therapists work with a wide range of individuals that need their services, including children, adults, and older adults with physicl, behavioral, cognitive, developmental, and intellectual disabilities.

To learn more about RT and the kinds of things that recreational therapists do, check out the following resources:

We searched REHABDATA and found various articles from the NIDILRR community on recreation and recreation therapy. Don’t forget to contact our information specialists, if you would like more information or would like to find more resources!