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Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC).

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Alternative and Augmentative Communication. Katherine Drager, Janice Lights, & David McNaughton Penn State University. Ideas that Work

Abstract: This webcast introduces the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) for children. What AAC is and the benefits of using ACC are explained. Five specific strategies to support a child who is learning to use ACC are discussed in detail: (1) provide lots of opportunities for the child to communicate, ask questions, make choices, greet others, express their feelings, and to comment on ongoing activities; (2) model the use of AAC by speaking and pointing to symbols on a board, book, or device, and speaking while signing; (3) wait to allow enough time for the child to communicate which gives the child a cue that it is their turn to respond and the opportunity to understand and figure out how to respond; (4) make sure to respond to any attempt to communicate by the child positively to motivate, encourage, and reinforce the power of communication; and (5) enjoy interacting with the child and make it fun. In addition, frequently asked questions are answered and information resources are listed. Run time: 21minutes 50 seconds.

NARIC Accession Number: O18416.  What's this?
Author(s): Drager, Kathryn; Light, Janice; McNaughton, David.
Project Number: H133E080011.
Publication Year: 2011.
Descriptor Terms: ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY, AUDIOVISUAL MATERIALS, AUGMENTATIVE AND ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION, CHILD DEVELOPMENT, CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES, COMMUNICATION DEVICES, COMMUNICATION SKILLS, EARLY INTERVENTION, FACILITATED COMMUNICATION, LANGUAGE DISORDERS, SPEECH IMPAIRMENTS.