News and Notes 307 April 4

NARIC offers information on access to healthcare, behavioral health, injury and violence prevention, and other public health issues in its NIDILRR Program Database and Research In Focus blog in observance of Minority Health Month, National Public Health Week, and National Interprofessional Health Care Month; Collaborative on Health Reform and Independent Living (CHRIL) has developed Disability and Health Insurance Online Self-Paced Tutorial; researchers from two NIDILRR-funded projects interviewed for "TBI survivors share their journey back to work" in online magazine Everyday Health; principal investigator of Examining Determinants of Negative Attribution Bias in People with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) receives 2018 Mitchell Rosenthal Mid-Career Award from the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine (ACRM); Mid-Atlantic ADA Regional Center hosts webinar, 5 Things to Know About People Who Are Deaf/Deaf-Blind/Hard of Hearing; Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Community Living and Participation for Individuals with Psychiatric Disabilities (TU Collaborative) hosts webinar, Promoting Participation in Community Life; Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Inclusive Technologies (Wireless Inclusive RERC) continues to recruit participants with disabilities for its Survey of User Needs (SUN) for Wireless Technologies; the Administration for Community Living (ACL) hosts six stakeholder feedback conference calls, targeting different stakeholder groups, to help inform the development of the Federal Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Coordination Plan.

Date sent: 
2018-04-04
NARIC news: 

Three national observances converge in April to bring public health into sharp focus: Minority Health Month, National Public Health Week, and National Interprofessional Health Care Month. These three events highlight the importance of working together to address health disparities and support a healthy nation. Whether working across agencies or across disciplines, bringing diverse skills, knowledge, and talents together can lead to innovation and discovery which benefit everyone. NIDILRR-funded project teams are shining examples of collaboration, partnering engineers with therapists, policy experts with clinicians, and professionals with self-advocates to focus on access to healthcare, behavioral health, injury and violence prevention, and other public health issues. Explore the full range of NIDILRR-funded projects by searching the NIDILRR Program Database and browsing our Research In Focus series to learn more about their work!

Resource Highlight: 

Disability and Health Insurance Online Self-Paced Tutorial
The NIDILRR-funded Collaborative on Health Reform and Independent Living (CHRIL) (90ARCP0001) has developed a course, Disability and Health Insurance Online Self-Paced Tutorial. This course provides a basic understanding of the US health insurance market. It also discusses the challenges that people with disabilities face in obtaining and maintaining affordable and comprehensive insurance coverage. The course requires about 30 minutes to complete. Registration is free and required.

News items: 

Article Spotlights TBI and Return to Work
Researchers from two NIDILRR-funded projects were interviewed for an article, TBI survivors share their journey back to work, in the online magazine Everyday Health. Kristen Dams-O'Connor, PhD, principal investigator for the New York Traumatic Brain Injury Model System Center at Mount Sinai (NY-TBI-MS) (90DPTB0009), discussed how each person's return-to-work experience is different and may involve gradually increasing their time at work. NIDILRR Switzer Fellow Kelli Williams Gary, PhD (90SF0014), discussed her own recovery and return to work after TBI.

NIDILRR Researcher Receives 2018 Mitchell Rosenthal
Mid-Career Award

Dawn Neumann, PhD, principal investigator of the NIDILRR-funded project on Examining Determinants of Negative Attribution Bias in People with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) (90IF0095), will receive the 2018 Mitchell Rosenthal Mid-Career Award from the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine (ACRM). The Mitchell Rosenthal Mid-Career Award recognizes clinician-scientists who are making significant contributions to the field of TBI rehabilitation research through their current work.

Grantee event: 

Webinar: 5 Things to Know About People Who Are Deaf, Deaf-Blind, or Hard of Hearing
The NIDILRR-funded Mid-Atlantic ADA Regional Center (90DP0089) will host a webinar, 5 Things to Know About People Who Are Deaf/Deaf-Blind/Hard of Hearing, April 12th, 12:30-1pm ET. Presenters will discuss some of the top things everyone should know about people with auditory disabilities, including a discussion of Deaf culture and tips on interacting with someone who has an auditory disability. Registration is free and required.

Webinar: Promoting Participation in Community Life
The NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Community Living and Participation for Individuals with Psychiatric Disabilities (TU Collaborative) (90RT5021) will host a webinar, Promoting Participation in Community Life, April 12th, 1-2pm ET. Presenters will introduce the TU Collaborative's new Jump-Starting Community Inclusion and Participation: A Toolkit for Promoting Participation in Community Life, a compendium of strategies and practical first steps that community mental health providers can take to more effectively support people to maximize their participation in everyday community life. Presenters will include innovators who have begun the process of change in their organizations. Registration is free and required.

Participate: 

Survey of User Needs for Wireless Technologies
The NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Inclusive Technologies (Wireless Inclusive RERC) (90RE5025) continues data collection through the Survey of User Needs (SUN) for Wireless Technologies. The SUN is the Wireless RERC's cornerstone survey on wireless technology use by people with disabilities first launched in 2001 and updated periodically in response to changes in technology. In addition to questions about cell phone and tablet use, the current survey collects information about wearables, smart home technologies, and other next-generation wirelessly-connected devices. The survey is open to all users and all disability types. User responses will help designers and engineers make new wireless devices and services for people with disabilities. Data from the SUN also provides important information to the wireless industry, government regulators, and other researchers to help them make wireless technology more accessible and more useful to people with all types of disabilities.

Elsewhere in the Community: 

ACL Seeks Feedback on TBI Federal Coordination Plan
The Administration for Community Living (ACL) will host six stakeholder feedback conference calls to help inform the development of the Federal Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Coordination Plan. The objectives of the forums are to: understand stakeholders' goals for improving coordination among relevant federal agencies; hear how federal programs are currently working well; identify gaps in current federal programs that support the TBI community; and receive input on strategies for improving federal coordination to address the needs of individuals who have sustained a TBI, their family members, and caregivers. Sessions are scheduled through April 19th and target different stakeholder groups. Schedule and registration are available online.