News and Notes 334 October 17

NARIC offers research and resources in mentoring from the NIDILRR community and elsewhere in observance of Disability Mentoring Day, a nationwide effort coordinated by the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD); NIDILRR celebrates its 40th Anniversary on October 18th, and Sen. Patty Murray issued remarks in acknowledgement of the anniversary which were entered into the Congressional Record; Research in Focus looks at challenges people with traumatic brain injury may face in empathizing with others; the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Statistics and Demographics (Stats RRTC) publishes issue brief, Vermont's Progressive Employment Program: A Preliminary Impact Analysis; accessible music technology developed by Dancing Dots, Inc. was featured in the September 30th episode of the Blind and Beyond Radio Show; researchers from the Langston University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (LU-RRTC) on Research and Capacity Building for Minority Entities were interviewed for episode of Open Your Eyes, broadcast on Tacoma (MD) Radio and online; the Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation Research (KTDRR) hosts webinar, KT101: An Introduction to Knowledge Translation (or How to Become Impactastic); the University of Pittsburgh Model Center on Spinal Cord Injury seeks individuals with spinal cord injury to utilize an app, KeepMvn, to track the rate of wheelchair breakdowns and associated adverse consequences; the Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) at the Department of Labor offers two factsheets on mentoring youth and young adults with disabilities: Career-Focused Mentoring for Youth: The What, Why, and How, and Cultivating Leadership: Mentoring Youth with Disabilities.

Date sent: 
2018-10-17
NARIC news: 

Today is Disability Mentoring Day, a nationwide effort coordinated by the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) to promote career development for students and job-seekers with disabilities through hands-on career exploration and ongoing mentoring relationships. Mentors may offer support, counseling, reinforcement, and constructive examples for a young person to reach their work and life goals. Mentorship can take several forms, such as a young person exploring a career field with an adult with many years of experience in that field, a peer mentoring relationship between a young person and someone with similar lived experience, or an emerging scholar or researcher working with an academic or clinical advisor in a program like the NIDILRR-funded Advanced Rehabilitation Research Training grants. Learn more about research and resources in mentoring from the NIDILRR community and elsewhere in our Spotlight blog.

Resource Highlight: 

Vermont Progressive Employment Program: A Preliminary Impact Analysis
The NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Statistics and Demographics (Stats RRTC) (90RT5022) has published an issue brief, Vermont's Progressive Employment Program: A Preliminary Impact Analysis. Progressive employment (PE) uses a flexible and gradual approach to employment for people who may face major barriers to employment success. Researchers used administrative data from Vermont to examine the impact of PE on vocational rehabilitation (VR) consumers in the state. The brief reports that PE increases the likelihood of exiting VR with a job and may also increase earnings after consumers leave VR.

NIDILRR News and Events: 

Celebrate NIDILRR's 40th Anniversary
Tomorrow, October 18th, NIDILRR will celebrate its 40th Anniversary with presentations and poster sessions from 1-5pm ET, in the Great Hall of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Hubert H. Humphrey Building in Washington, DC. The event will bring together Directors from throughout NIDILRR's history, celebrate featured accomplishments and contributions made to the field by NIDILRR grantees, and focus on the future direction of disability, independent living, and rehabilitation research. The event will be live streamed on the HHS website. Questions may be sent to nidilrr.acl.40@neweditions.net.

On October 11th, Senator Patty Murray (Washington State) issued remarks in acknowledgment of NIDILRR's 40th anniversary and the achievements of the NIDILRR grantee community which were entered into the Congressional record (PDF).

Research In Focus:
People with Traumatic Brain Injuries May Face Challenges in Empathizing with Others
This week's Research In Focus looks at the challenges men and women with traumatic brain injury may face in empathizing with and understanding the perspectives of others, and whether gender might make a difference in that experience.

News items: 

Accessible Music Technology Featured on Blind and Beyond Radio Show
Accessible music technology, developed by Dancing Dots, Inc., under several NIDILRR-funded Small Business Innovation Research grants, was featured in the September 30th episode (MP3) of the Blind and Beyond Radio Show, broadcast on several radio stations across the US and online. Dancing Dots director Bill McCann was interviewed about GOODFEEL, Lime, and Lime Aloud, technology used by musicians who are blind or low vision to read, write, and record music.

LU-RRTC on Takoma Radio
Researchers from the NIDILRR-funded Langston University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (LU-RRTC) on Research and Capacity Building for Minority Entities (90RT5024) were interviewed for the October 15th episode of Open Your Eyes, broadcast on Takoma (MD) Radio and online. The interview covered key research findings from the RRTC in the last five years and innovative projects planned for the near future. Open Your Eyes is a radio show that focuses on the inclusion of people with disabilities within society.

Grantee event: 

Webcast: KT101 - An Introduction to Knowledge Translation
The NIDILRR-funded Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation Research (KTDRR) (90DPKT0001) will host a webcast, KT101: An Introduction to Knowledge Translation (or How to Become Impactastic), November 1st, 1-2:30pm ET. This webcast will provide an overview of basic information about KT for participants who are new to the field, and a review for those with more experience. The presentation will focus on practices that help move research to impact and is a pre-conference session ahead of the 2018 Online KT Conference hosted by KTDRR. Registration is free and required for the webcast, but you do not need to register for the Online KT Conference to attend this webcast.

Participate: 

Wheelchair Breakdown and Maintenance Survey
The NIDILRR-funded University of Pittsburgh Model Center on Spinal Cord Injury (90SI5014) seeks individuals with spinal cord injury to utilize an app, KeepMvn, to track the rate of wheelchair breakdowns as well as adverse consequences which may occur. Participants must have a non-progressive spinal cord injury that occurred at least one year ago, use a manual or powered wheelchair as a primary means of mobility for 40 or more hours per week, and have access to a smartphone or tablet with Internet access. Qualified participants will use the app to record each breakdown or repair, and answer questionnaires on a quarterly basis about their wheelchair use. The first 200 participants will be compensated for each quarterly update. Additional study and compensation information is available from the study website.

Elsewhere in the Community: 

ODEP Resources on Mentoring Youth with Disabilities
The Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) at the Department of Labor offers two factsheets on mentoring youth and young adults with disabilities. Career-Focused Mentoring for Youth; The What, Why, and How introduces mentoring during the transition from school to work, with guideposts explaining how mentoring activities can be used to support career preparation by assisting young people in meeting their transition-related and developmental needs. Cultivating Leadership: Mentoring Youth with Disabilities details the benefits of mentorship for young people, their mentors, and their employers, and outlines the features of a successful mentor relationship.