News and Notes 335 October 24

NARIC's Spotlight blog highlights research and resources from the NIDILRR community and elsewhere about self-employment and entrepreneurship for people with disabilities; Research in Focus looks at how a brief program may help people build resilience after a traumatic brain injury; the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Integrated Health Care and Self-Directed Recovery offers web resource, Academy for Policy Makers, providing information about policy initiatives in behavioral health and integrated health care; University of Alabama at Birmingham Traumatic Brain Injury Model System Center (UAB-TBIMS) launches Primary Care Provider Education Resource Network for Traumatic Brain Injury; the Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation Research (KTDRR) and the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Promoting Interventions for Community Living (RRTC/PICL) host webcast, Multifaceted Interventions for Supporting Community Participation Among Adults with Disabilities: A Systematic Review; Spaulding Hospital-New England Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center (SNERSCIC) hosts webcast, Shaping the Spinal Cord Injury Research Landscape: How Consumers Can Make a Difference; the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Community Living, Health, and Function (LiveWell RERC) sponsors the LiveWell 2019 Student App Challenge, an app development competition for middle, high school, and college students; the National Council on Disability (NCD) issues report, National Disability Employment Policy, From the New Deal to the Real Deal: Joining the Industries of the Future, assessing the status of employment for people with disabilities under Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Date sent: 
2018-10-24
NARIC news: 

For some people with disabilities, the path to employment success veers toward starting their own businesses. Self-employment and entrepreneurship offer job seekers with disabilities access to economic independence without some of the barriers they may experience with traditional employment such as limited transportation options, inflexible work schedule, and lack of local opportunities. This is particularly true for people with disabilities in rural areas. A recent study found that people with disabilities in the US are almost twice as likely to be self-employed as their peers without disabilities. Our Spotlight blog recently highlighted research and resources from the NIDILRR community and elsewhere about self-employment, entrepreneurship, and how agencies can support individuals with disabilities who choose to blaze their own path to employment.

Research In Focus:
A Brief Program May Help People Build Resilience After a Traumatic Brain Injury
This week's Research In Focus looks at how a brief program may help people with traumatic brain injury build resilience to cope with changes and challenges after their injury.

Resource Highlight: 

Academy for Policy Makers
The NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Integrated Health Care and Self-Directed Recovery (90RT5038) offers an Academy for Policy Makers, a web resource providing information and technical assistance about policy initiatives in behavioral health and integrated health care. The Academy features toolkits about current behavioral health and disability policies, including disability employment policy, the opioid crisis, jail diversion and alternative justice models, and Medicaid reform, among others. The online toolkits contain links to policy reports and policy strategies being used in various states, along with infographics, webinars, and podcasts on each topical area. This project is also supported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

News items: 

UAB-TBIMS Launches Education Resource for Health Care Providers
The NIDILRR-funded University of Alabama at Birmingham Traumatic Brain Injury Model System Center (UAB-TBIMS) (90DPTB0015) has launched the Primary Care Provider Education Resource Network for Traumatic Brain Injury, designed to help health care providers support the primary care of their patients with TBI and the unique medical complications which may be associated with their long-term recovery. The network's website offers educational resources for managing patients with TBI, including common secondary conditions they may experience. Current topics include anger and irritability, depression, return to driving, sleep disturbance, substance use, wheelchair and seating, and ADA compliance guidelines. The resource network also features 800/UAB-MIST, a 24-hour hotline for health care professionals anywhere in the US to consult with a UAB specialist if needed. Resources for individuals with TBI and their families are also available through the UAB-TBIMS Information Network.

Grantee event: 

Webcast: Multifaceted Interventions for Supporting Community Participation Among Adults with Disabilities - A Systematic Review
The NIDILRR-funded Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation Research (KTDRR) (90DPKT0001) and the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Promoting Interventions for Community Living (RRTC/PICL) (90RT5063) will host a webcast, Multifaceted Interventions for Supporting Community Participation Among Adults with Disabilities: A Systematic Review, October 29th, 2-3pm ET, to present the process and results of a systematic review. Presenters will discuss their efforts to identify multifaceted interventions that are effective in facilitating increased community participation, including employment outcomes, for adults with disabilities. Registration is free and required.

Webcast: Shaping the Spinal Cord Injury Research Landscape: How Consumers Can Make a Difference
The NIDILRR-funded Spaulding Hospital-New England Regional Spinal Cord Injury Center (SNERSCIC) (90SI5021) will host a webcast, Shaping the Spinal Cord Injury Research Landscape: How Consumers Can Make a Difference, November 8th, 6:30-8pm ET, part of the Knowledge in Motion series. Presenters will discuss how people with SCI and their caregivers can influence research priorities in SCI, channels and methods for submitting feedback and ideas for future SCI research, and barriers and facilitators to participation in clinical trials. Registration is free and required.

Participate: 

LiveWell 2019 Student App Challenge
The NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Community Living, Health, and Function (LiveWell RERC) (90RE5023) is sponsoring the LiveWell 2019 Student App Challenge, an app development competition for middle, high school, and college students, as well as non-professional developers to create apps that can be used by people with disabilities and people who are aging. Suggested target areas include, but are not limited to, health and function, accessibility, money management, navigation, home automation and control, personal communication, and access to public announcements and notifications. Judging will take place in May 2019 with three submissions selected for a cash award, and two selected for random prizes. Guidelines and qualifications are described on the competition website.

Elsewhere in the Community: 

Report on National Disability Employment Policy
The National Council on Disability (NCD) has issued a report, National Disability Employment Policy, From the New Deal to the Real Deal: Joining the Industries of the Future, which assesses the status of employment for people with disabilities under Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act. In this report, NCD explores trends regarding workers with disabilities being paid below minimum wage and highlights recent policy changes impacting this employment model. The report also discusses the need to build capacity and infrastructure for supported employment services and gives recommendations on how to change pay structures and how to make improvements to the processes of employment service providers who support people with disabilities.