News and Notes 363 May 22

NARIC answers questions from Spanish speakers about disability and rehabilitation in its monthly blog series, Answered Questions/Preguntas y Respuestas, drawing on information from NIDILRR-funded projects, items in the Research in Focus series, and resources from organizations serving English and Spanish speakers in the US and abroad; the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures: Building Self-Determination and Community Living and Participation (Pathways RTC) publishes guide, Important Information for Parents and Friends of Young People Experiencing Psychosis: Lessons Learned From Young Adult Graduates of EASA; the Rehabilitation Research Center on Augmentative and Alternative Communication (RERC on AAC) hosted the 2019 Doctoral Student AAC Research Think Tank at Pennsylvania State University; the Mid-Atlantic ADA Regional Center hosts webinar, Curbside Access, providing information on designing sidewalk connections to modes of transportation such as transit, passenger vehicles, and share-bike systems; the project on Career Self-Management Through Job Crafting for People with Physical and Mild Cognitive Disabilities: a Mixed Methods Study seeks adult participants with disabilities for a study developing a program to help people to re-envision and refine aspects of their job; the Interagency Committee on Disability Research (ICDR), of which NIDILRR is a member, has released its Government-Wide Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 2018-2021, a comprehensive plan for disability, independent living, and rehabilitation research.

Date sent: 
2019-05-22
NARIC news: 

Part of our daily tasks include answering questions from Spanish speakers about disability and rehabilitation. We keep track of these questions and choose one to answer through our monthly blog series, Answered Questions/Preguntas y Respuestas. To help answer these questions, we search for current NIDILRR-funded projects; articles in our collection; items in our Research In Focus series; and news, research, and other resources from organizations and agencies that serve English and Spanish speakers in the US and abroad. Answered Questions articles are published in Spanish and English. Follow our Spotlight blog and join us on Twitter @NARICenEspanol and Facebook @NARICenEspanol for the latest installment!

Resource Highlight: 

Guide: Important Information for Parents and Friends of Young People Experiencing Psychosis
The NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures: Building Self-Determination and Community Living and Participation (Pathways RTC) (90RT5030) has published a guide, Important Information for Parents and Friends of Young People Experiencing Psychosis: Lessons Learned from Young Adult Graduates of EASA (PDF). The guide covers basic information about psychosis and tips for supporting a young person experiencing psychosis, including ways to improve communication, promote recovery, and take care of oneself and family. The guide was developed with input from young adults with psychiatric disabilities who participated in the Early Assessment and Support Alliance (EASA). This project is also supported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

News items: 

RERC on AAC Hosts Doctoral Think Tank
The NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Augmentative and Alternative Communication (RERC on AAC) (90RE5017) hosted the 2019 Doctoral Student AAC Research Think Tank May 19th to the 21st. More than 20 doctoral students and faculty came together on the campus of Pennsylvania State University to discuss strategies for developing research careers in AAC. The three-day event included presentations by individuals on their current research projects, as well as a general discussion of conducting significant research in AAC and supporting meaningful participation of people with disabilities in research. Presentation highlights are available from the Think Tank website and by following #AACThinkTank on Twitter.

Grantee event: 

Webinar: Curbside Access
The NIDILRR-funded Mid-Atlantic ADA Regional Center (90DP0089) will host a webinar, Curbside Access, May 28th, 2-3:30 pm ET. Presenters will provide information on designing sidewalk connections to modes of transportation, such as transit, passenger vehicles, and shared-bike systems. This webinar is the third in a four-part series, Promoting Independence and Access Through Responsible Design. The series is designed to improve understanding of why and how to provide accessible pedestrian facilities in the public right of way. Registration is free and required. Continuing education recognition is available for a fee.

Participate: 

Job Crafting Study
The NIDILRR-funded project Career Self-Management Through Job Crafting for People with Physical and Mild Cognitive Disabilities: A Mixed Methods Study (90IFRE0008) seeks adults with disabilities for a study to develop and test a program to help people to re-envision and refine aspects of their job (PDF). Participants must be between 18 and 64 years of age with a physical or health condition that limits their work performance, currently working or returning to work, have at least 1 year of work experience, and may not be participating in any workers compensation program. Participation is online, so there are no travel requirements. Participants may receive up to $100 for their time. For more information or to volunteer, contact Kristin King at 603/862-1924 or kristin.king@unh.edu.

Elsewhere in the Community: 

ICDR Releases Government-Wide Strategic Plan
The Interagency Committee on Disability Research (ICDR), of which NIDILRR is a member, released its Government-Wide Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 2018-2021 (PDF) - a comprehensive government-wide strategic plan for disability, independent living, and rehabilitation research. The plan contains specific goals and objectives for the next three years, with a crosscutting thematic approach that emphasizes transparency, accountability, inclusion of the stakeholder community, and coordination with other existing and emerging Federal interagency efforts. The plan was developed with input from stakeholders, including individuals with disabilities, researchers, policymakers, and providers.