News and Notes 375 August 14

In its Spotlight blog, NARIC highlights NIDILRR-funded research conducted at the top ten rehabilitation hospitals ranked by US News and World Report; the Temple University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Community Living and Participation of People with Serious Mental Illness (TU Collaborative) publishes new toolkit, Hunting for Better Health Outcomes: A Geocaching Toolkit for Individuals with Mental Illness, geocaching being a world-wide mobile scavenger hunt using global positioning coordinates to find and hide objects; two researchers from the Ohio Regional TBI Model System Center and the Indiana TBI Model System Center receive awards from the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA); the Boston-Harvard Burn Injury Model System Center (BH-BIMS) launches weekly program of free yoga classes open to people with disabilities, family, friends, and members of the local community; the Pacific ADA Regional Center hosts webinar, Opioid Use Disorder and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in Health Care Settings; the Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation Research (KTDRR) to host the 2019 Online Knowledge Translation Conference: Innovative KT Strategies That Work; the Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center (MSKTC) seeks people with spinal cord injuries (SCI), people with burn injuries, and caregivers to give feedback on two new factsheets, Personal Care Attendants and SCI and Delirium After Burn Injury; the Administration for Community Living (ACL) releases issue brief, Wheelchair-Accessible Medical Diagnostic Equipment: Cutting Edge Technology, Cost-Effective for Health Care Providers, and Consumer-Friendly.

Date sent: 
2019-08-14
NARIC news: 

Recently, the magazine US News and World Report released its rankings of rehabilitation hospitals across the US. The rankings are determined entirely by expert opinion, with at least 5% of surveyed rehabilitation specialists recommending a facility in three years of surveys. The top ten rehabilitation hospitals on this list are all home to one or more current NIDILRR-funded research and development projects, from five-year centers to individual fellowships. These hospitals have hosted more than 250 projects over more than 35 years. Learn more about the NIDILRR-funded research conducted at these hospitals over the decades in our Spotlight blog!

Resource Highlight: 

Hunting for Better Health Outcomes: A Geocaching Toolkit
The NIDILRR-funded Temple University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Community Living and Participation of People with Serious Mental Illness (TU Collaborative) (90RTCP0001) has published a new toolkit, Hunting for Better Health Outcomes: A Geocaching Toolkit for Individuals with Mental Illnesses. Geocaching is a world-wide mobile scavenger hunt using global positioning coordinates to find and hide objects. The toolkit describes strategies for recreation therapists and other mental health professionals to use geocaching as a way to improve health outcomes of individuals with serious mental illnesses (SMI). The toolkit provides an overview of geocaching, the health needs of individuals with SMI, the potential impact of geocaching on three health needs of individuals with SMI (i.e., cognitive, social, and physical needs), and intervention recommendations.

News items: 

NIDILRR Researchers Receive BIAA Awards
Two researchers from NIDILRR-funded Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Model System Centers will receive awards from the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA). Jennifer Ann Bogner, PhD, principal investigator for the Ohio Regional TBI Model System Center (90DPTB0001), will receive the William Fields Caveness Award. This award is given in recognition of an individual who, through research on both a national and international level, has made outstanding contributions to bettering the lives of people who have sustained brain injury. Dr. Bogner also chairs the NIDILRR TBI Model Systems’ Strategic Planning Committee. Samantha Backhaus, PhD, co-investigator for the Indiana TBI Model System Center (90DP0036), will receive the Sheldon Berrol, MD, Clinical Service Award. This award is given to an individual who, through a long service career, has made outstanding contributions to improving the quality of care, professional training, and education in the field of brain injury. Both awards will be presented at the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine Annual Conference in November.

Model System Center Expands Popular Yoga Class
The NIDILRR-funded Boston-Harvard Burn Injury Model System Center (BH-BIMS) (90BPBU0001) recently launched a weekly program of free yoga classes open to people with disabilities, family, friends, and members of the local community. The class started as a monthly program at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, but has grown in popularity and now meets every Tuesday. Instructors lead participants in a gentle vinyasa or flow yoga, as well as chair yoga, to accommodate participants of all abilities. Mats, chairs, and props are all provided free of charge. Visit the BH-BIMS Facebook page to learn more about this class.

Grantee event: 

Webinar: Opioid Use Disorder and the ADA in Health Care Settings
The NIDILRR-funded Pacific ADA Regional Center (90DP0081) will host a webinar, Opioid Use Disorder and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in Health Care Settings, August 22nd, 2:30-4pm ET. Presenters will discuss how the ADA impacts persons with opioid use disorders in a variety of health care settings, and how to eliminate discrimination that results in barriers to treatment and recovery. Registration is free and required.

Online Knowledge Translation Conference: Innovative KT Strategies That Work
The NIDILRR-funded Center on Knowledge Translation for Disability and Rehabilitation Research (KTDRR) (90DPKT0001) will host the 2019 Online Knowledge Translation Conference: Innovative KT Strategies That Work, October 28th, 30th, and November 1st. The conference will bring together research-based KT tools and strategies to increase the use of research findings. Presentations will address a range of effective and innovative approaches to translating, disseminating, and using knowledge and will describe methods designed to measure KT outcomes. Registration is free and required.

Participate: 

SCI and Burn Injury Consumer Factsheet Testing
The NIDILRR-funded Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center (MSKTC) (90DP0082) is recruiting people with spinal cord injuries (SCI), people with burn injuries, and caregivers to provide feedback on two new factsheets. People with SCI and their caregivers are needed to test a factsheet on Personal Care Attendants and SCI. People with burn injuries and their caregivers are needed to test a factsheet on Delirium After Burn Injury. Participants must be at least 18 years old to participate and will receive a $25 gift card for their time. For more information or to register, contact MSKTC at 202/403-5600 or msktc@air.org.

Elsewhere in the Community: 

ACL Brief Highlights the Impact of Accessible Medical Diagnostic Equipment
The Administration for Community Living (ACL) released an issue brief, Wheelchair-Accessible Medical Diagnostic Equipment: Cutting Edge Technology, Cost-Effective for Health Care Providers, and Consumer-Friendly (DOC), explaining the benefits of accessible medical diagnostic equipment (MDE) for providers and patients alike. The brief describes what accessible MDE is, how it can address health care disparities, and how it can help health care providers increase access for their patients with disabilities and promote compliance with civil rights obligations. It highlights the many benefits of incorporating accessible MDE for providers, including the reduction of occupational injuries, increased workforce retention, and enhanced patient experience. Finally, this document highlights the availability of tax credits and technical assistance resources to facilitate the adoption of accessible MDE.