News and Notes 427 August 26

NARIC publishes examples of NIDILRR researchers' use of visual methods to share information in its blog to help readers use these innovative tools to share research with their communities; NIDILRR announces its plan for releasing grant forecasts and funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) for Fiscal Year 2021; Research in Focus looks at some early signs of consciousness in people recovering from stroke or traumatic brain injury; the Northwest ADA Regional Center and the ADA National Network Knowledge Translation Center publish factsheet, Accessibility at Drive-Thru Medical Sites; the ADA Network Knowledge Translation Center publishes research brief, Digital Access and Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), framing digital accessibility as an issue for businesses, agencies, and organizations considered public entities under the ADA; the Center for Research, Training, and Dissemination of Family Support for People with Disabilities Across the Life Course hosts virtual Town Hall: Family Caregivers and COVID-19, highlighting the Center's recent finding that family caregivers are being more negatively impacted by the pandemic than their non-caregiver counterparts; the Great Lakes ADA Regional Center hosts two-part webinar, Using the ADA and ABA Standards Series: Chapter 8 - Special Rooms, Spaces, and Elements, Part 1 and Part 2; Parents Empowering Parents: National Research Center for Parents with Disabilities and Their Families (NRCPD) seeks essay or video submissions from parents with disabilities who are willing to share their experiences about barriers that they face; the US Department of Health and Human Services releases its Healthy People 2030 framework, establishing public health priorities that help individuals, organizations, and communities improve the health and well-being of the nation.

Date sent: 
2020-08-26
NARIC news: 

There's an old saying that "A picture is worth a thousand words." A photograph, illustration, or short video can be used to convey important information in an understandable and compelling format. Some researchers are using images to share information with their stakeholders. These can include infographics summarizing research results, maps conveying data about communities, comics or graphics telling a story, or short videos that feature engaging storytellers. We gathered some examples of researchers from the NIDILRR community and elsewhere using visual methods to share information in our blog, along with resources to help you use these innovative tools to share research with your community.

Research In Focus:
What are the First Signs of Consciousness After a Severe Brain Injury?
This week's Research In Focus looks at some of the earliest signs of consciousness in people recovering from stroke or traumatic brain injury, which ones may appear first, and how long it may be before those signs emerge.
 
Resource Highlight: 
Accessibility at Drive-Thru Medical Sites
The NIDILRR-funded Northwest ADA Regional Center (90DP0095) and the ADA National Network Knowledge Translation Center (90DP0086) have published a factsheet, Accessibility at Drive-Thru Medical Sites. This factsheet lists considerations and strategies to promote accessibility at drive-thru medical sites, including those sites where patients may be asked to exit their vehicles. It includes suggestions for training staff on disability etiquette, ensuring access for wheelchair users and accessible vans, understanding the right to service animals, providing effective communication, and additional measures for greater access. The factsheet also includes additional resources from federal agencies and community organizations. This factsheet is also available in Spanish.
 
NIDILRR News and Events: 
NIDILRR’s Timeline for Grant Forecasts and Funding Opportunity Announcements in Fiscal Year 2021
NIDILRR recently announced its plan for releasing grant forecasts and funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) for FY 2021. NIDILRR will publish three competition forecasts in late summer or early fall, with FOAs released in October. NIDILRR aims to publish all other forecasts in December with full FOAs available in January through March. Read the full announcement.
 
News items: 
New Report Highlights Digital Access as a Public Accommodation Issue
The NIDILRR-funded ADA Network Knowledge Translation Center (90DP0086) has published a research brief, Digital Access and Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), highlighting the impact of the digital divide for people with disabilities and framing digital accessibility as an issue for businesses, agencies, and organizations considered public entities under Title III of the ADA. The report finds that people with disabilities have less access to and benefit less from technology than people without disabilities. In addition, most websites are not fully accessible, nor do access guidelines fully address access needs. The report also discusses how developers can enhance access and usability throughout the development process and highlights the benefits of creating accessible technology, such as attracting a broader customer base.
 
Grantee event: 
Virtual Town Hall on Family Caregivers and COVID-19 TOMORROW
The NIDILRR-funded Center for Research, Training, and Dissemination of Family Support for People with Disabilities Across the Life Course (90TRGE0002) will host a virtual Town Hall: Family Caregivers and COVID-19, August 27th, 2-3:30 pm ET. A panel of family caregivers, policy experts, and legislators will discuss their experiences during the pandemic, highlighted by the Center’s recent report finding that family caregivers are being more negatively impacted by the pandemic than their non-caregiver counterparts. Registration is free and required.
 
Webinar: Using the ADA and ABA Standards Chapter 8 - Special Rooms, Spaces, and Elements
The NIDILRR-funded Great Lakes ADA Regional Center (90DP0091) will host a two-part webinar, Using the ADA and ABA Standards Series: Chapter 8 - Special Rooms, Spaces, and Elements, Part 1 September 3rd, 2:30-4 pm ET, and Part 2 October 1st, 2:30-4 pm ET. These sessions will review scoping and technical provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) Accessibility Standards for special rooms, spaces, and elements. Part 1 will address requirements for wheelchair spaces, companion seats, and designated aisle seats in assembly areas; fitting, dressing, and locker rooms; kitchens and kitchenettes; and transient lodging rooms. Part 2 will address requirements for medical care and long-term care facilities, holding cells, courtrooms, residential dwelling units, transportation facilities, and storage. Registration is free and required for both events. Continuing education recognition is available.
 
Participate: 
NRCPD Seeks Submissions for Community Blog
The NIDILRR-funded Parents Empowering Parents: National Research Center for Parents with Disabilities and Their Families (NRCPD) (90DPGE0001) is accepting submissions to their community blog in English and Spanish about the barriers that parents with disabilities encounter. Participants must be parents with disabilities who are willing to share their experiences about the barriers that they face. Entries may be essays or videos and must be submitted by September 15th. Writers will receive $100 for accepted submissions. For more information and to submit an entry, email centerforparents@brandeis.edu.
 
Elsewhere in the Community: 
HHS Releases Healthy People 2030
The US Department of Health and Human Services has released its Healthy People 2030 framework. The Healthy People framework establishes public health priorities that help individuals, organizations, and communities improve the health and well-being of the nation. It establishes goals and data-driven benchmarks for improving a variety of health outcomes across a wide range of populations, including goals relevant to people with disabilities, older adults, and caregivers. Objectives relevant to these audiences include reducing the proportion of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who live in institutional settings, improving rehabilitation outcomes for people with traumatic brain injuries, and increasing the proportion of national surveys with questions that identify people with disabilities, among many others.