News and Notes 364 May 29

In observance of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Awareness Month and Better Speech and Hearing Month, NARIC looks at research and resources on ALS and speech-language pathologies in its Spotlight blog; the ADA Knowledge Translation Center and the New England ADA Regional Center publish factsheet, the ADA, Addiction, and Recovery; Exercise and Fitness After Spinal Cord Injury, video produced by the Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center (MSKTC) in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh Model Center on Spinal Cord Injury, receives Silver Telly Award; principal investigator for the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Statistics and Demographics (StatsRRTC) was interviewed by The Exchange on New Hampshire Public Radio (NHPR); the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Employment Policy and Measurement (EPM-RRTC) hosts June session of the National Trends in Disability Employment (nTIDE) Lunch & Learn webinar series, featuring latest Jobs Report release from the Bureau of Labor Statistics; the Southeast ADA Regional Center hosts latest episode of Ada Live!, Effective Communication, Accessible Health Care, and the ADA; the project Building Capacity to Improve Community Participation for People Aging with Long-Term Disability Through Evidence-Based Strategies seeks adult participants with physical disabilities for its Aging and Disability Study; the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) release brief report, Artificial Intelligence Applications for Older Adults and People with Disabilities: Balancing Safety and Autonomy: Proceedings of a Workshop.

Date sent: 
2019-05-29
NARIC news: 

May is Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Awareness Month, organized by the ALS Association, and it's also Better Speech and Hearing Month, organized by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Why do we put these two together? As ALS progresses, it can weaken the muscles of the larynx, throat, and mouth, making it difficult for a person to speak. People with ALS may work with a speech therapist or speech-language pathologist at different stages of their progression to maintain as many communication skills and strategies as possible. They may also work with their therapist to select augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices and other assistive technology to help with communication. We took a look at some of the research and resources in this area from the NIDILRR community and elsewhere in our Spotlight blog.

Resource Highlight: 

Factsheet: The ADA, Addiction, and Recovery
The NIDILRR-funded ADA Knowledge Translation Center (90DP0086) and the New England ADA Regional Center (90DP0087) have published a factsheet, The ADA, Addiction, and Recovery. The factsheet provides information on the structure of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the definition of disability, and how addiction to drugs and alcohol, as well as medication-assisted treatment, are covered by the ADA. The factsheet uses scenarios to demonstrate how the ADA may be applied for individuals with or in recovery from substance use disorders.

News items: 

MSKTC and Model System Win Silver Telly Award
Exercise and Fitness After Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), a video produced by the NIDILRR-funded Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center (MSKTC) (90DP0082) in collaboration with researchers and individuals with SCI from the NIDILRR-funded University of Pittsburgh Model Center on Spinal Cord Injury (90SI5014), was awarded a 2019 Silver Telly Award. The 19-minute video features individuals with SCI who share their fitness routines and explain how exercise has improved their quality of life. The Telly Awards honor video and television productions across all screens.

NIDILRR Researcher Interviewed in NHPR's The Exchange
Andrew J. Houtenville, PhD, principal investigator for the NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Statistics and Demographics (StatsRRTC) (90RTGE0001), joined The Exchange from New Hampshire Public Radio (NHPR) for a discussion on disability and employment as part of their In-Depth series on New Hampshire's workforce shortage and untapped workers. The discussion included the contributions of workers with disabilities, older workers, people with justice involvement, and immigrant workers, as well as the employment statistics among these groups.

Grantee event: 

Webinar: nTIDE Lunch & Learn
The NIDILRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Employment Policy and Measurement (EPM-RRTC) (90RT5037) will host the June session of the National Trends in Disability Employment (nTIDE) Lunch & Learn webinar series, June 7th, 12-1pm ET. The webinar will feature details of the latest Jobs Report release from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and how it fits into longer term employment trends for people with disabilities. The webinar will also include information about programs and research across the country that address employment and disability and a guest presentation from the Center for Public Representation. Registration is free and required. Past episodes of the nTIDE Lunch & Learn webinar series can be found in the archives.

ADA Live! Effective Communication, Accessible Health Care, and the ADA
The NIDILRR-funded Southeast ADA Regional Center (90DP0090) will host the latest episode of ADA Live!, Effective Communication, Accessible Health Care, and the ADA, June 5th, 1-1:30pm ET. Presenters will discuss recent studies that indicate that people with disabilities experience both health disparities and specific barriers in access to health care programs and services. They will also discuss health care access and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the role of effective communication in health care decisions, and how health care providers and facilities can be more inclusive of patients with disabilities. No registration is required and questions may be submitted in advance.

Participate: 

Aging and Disability Study
The NIDILRR-funded project Building Capacity to Improve Community Participation for People Aging with Long-Term Disability Through Evidence-Based Strategies (90DPCP0001) seeks adults with physical disabilities to participate in the Aging and Disability Study. Researchers aim to learn more about the chronic health conditions people living with long-term disabilities experience as they age, as well as how they participate and engage in their communities and with family and friends. Participants will be asked to complete three surveys over two years, online or by phone, and will be compensated for their time. Complete the screening questionnaire to determine eligibility.

Elsewhere in the Community: 

NASEM Proceedings Explore AI for People with Disabilities and Older Adults
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) have released a brief report, Artificial Intelligence Applications for Older Adults and People with Disabilities: Balancing Safety and Autonomy: Proceedings of a Workshop. The proceedings are from an October 2018 workshop, hosted by the Forum on Aging, Disability, and Independence, which examined the state of the art and knowledge about artificial intelligence (AI). The workshop explored the potential of AI to foster a balance of safety and autonomy for older adults and people with disabilities who strive to live as independently as possible.